Agenda & Speakers

Petfood R&D Showcase Agenda

October 15, 2019

4 p.m. 

Registration opens
KSU Alumni Center

5-6 p.m. 

Opening networking reception
KSU Alumni Center

October 16, 2019

7-8 a.m.

Registration material pick-up and check-in
KSU Alumni Center

7-8 a.m.

Continental breakfast
KSU Alumni Center

8:05-8:15 a.m.

Welcome to Petfood R&D Showcase 
Banquet Room B, KSU Alumni Center

8:15-9 a.m.

Showcase kick-off presentation
Greg Aldrich, Ph.D.

Banquet Room B, KSU Alumni Center

9-9:45 a.m.

Behaviors as biomarkers for animal health, welfare 
Lindsey Hulbert, Ph.D., assistant professor, animal behavior, Kansas State University
Animal caretakers use behavior as their primary method of making housing and management decisions, and behavior has long been considered a subjective measure. Behavior also is often perceived as inaccessible, which may be due to the sensationalism of “animal whisperers.” Nonetheless, behavior is a direct representation of the animal’s nervous system and brain. With advancements and accessibility of technology, behavior measures now serve as more valid, sensitive and real-time biomarkers than the standard health biomarkers (e.g., heart rate, blood hormones). This presentation will cover some of the advancements in behavioral technologies that are currently being tested in pigs and cattle to improve both health and animal welfare.
K-State Alumni Center

9:45-10 a.m.

Break
K-State Alumni Center

10-10:45 a.m. 

Resistant starch and factors that influence starch digestibility
Yong-Cheng Shi, Ph.D., professor, Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University
Starches from different botanical sources have different enzyme digestibility and resistant starch content. Many factors including starch composition, granular morphology, surface organization, granular architecture, type of crystal polymorph, granular size and the presence of compound granules have been suggested to have large effects on the rate and extent of enzymatic hydrolysis. However, the exact underlying mechanism of relative resistance of starch granules is complicated and not well understood because those factors are often interconnected. In addition, the susceptibility of starch granules to enzymes and the extent of enzymatic hydrolysis are controlled by enzyme sources, enzyme and substrate concentration, hydrolysis temperature, and time, as well as the presence of other components. Processing conditions such as grinding, hydrothermal treatment, pelleting also affect starch digestibility and the underlying causes will be discussed.
K-State Alumni Center

10:45-11:30 a.m. 

How pathogens contaminate pet food
Janak Dhakal Ph.D., post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University
Learn about the various ways and stages at which the pathogens (Salmonella, E. coli, fungus) contaminate pet food and their effects on pet food, humans and the industry. The presentation will cover approaches to take to control contamination of pathogens and their mitigation strategies at post-processing steps by the use of antimicrobials and topical additives. Research data on Salmonella mitigation in pet food that are generated in the Kansas State University pet food lab will be presented.

K-State Alumni Center

11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 

Lunch and keynote presentation: How marketing, science and consumer preference drive premiumization in pet food
Natasha Davis, strategic client partner, Nielsen

At the turn of the century, while many of the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) categories in the U.S. felt the impact of a down-turned economy, pet care established itself to be “recession proof.” With annual expenditures increasing by about 6% each year, the overall category increased by nearly USD$46.9 billion between 2001 and 2019; dog and cat food account for roughly 40% of those sales. Growth of pet food in the U.S. can be attributed to many factors. At the intersection of science and industry, Davis will share a perspective on pet food growth in America through the lens of “premiumization” and how it is affected by marketing, science and consumer preference.
Banquet Room B, KSU Alumni Center

1:15-2 p.m. 

Mites in semi-moist pet foods: Exploring strategies to prevent infestation
Tom Phillips, Ph.D., professor of entomology, Kansas State University
Semi-moist pet food products are at constant risk from infestation by a serious pest that is known as the mold mite, or the cheese mite, and sometime the ham mite, with the scientific name Tyrophagus putrescentiae. This presentation will include a review of the biology of this mite pest to center on its adaptations for infesting pet foods; the history of certain generally regarded as safe (GRAS) food preservatives, particularly propylene glycol, to prevent infestations; the potential for a variety of food additives to protect pet foods from mites; the potential for mite-proof food packages; and an overview of general pest management approaches to reduce the risk of mite infestation and ensure manufacture and delivery of pest-free high value pet foods.
K-State Alumni Center

2-2:15 p.m. 

Closing and thank you
Gordon Smith, PhD., Professor, Head and IGP Institute Director at Kansas State University
K-State Alumni Center

2:15-2:45 p.m. 

Break
K-State Alumni Center

2:45-3:30 p.m. 

Workshop presentation 1: Presented by Balchem
Leveraging microencapsulation technology for pet nutrition — Consumers continue to demand pet products that look and smell similar to human foods. Safely translating food science technology into companion animal nutrition requires an understanding of both nutritional requirements and processing controls. This section will demonstrate how to translate food technology for better process control. We will have several demonstrations with a variety of processing conditions or applications featuring industry-leading microencapsulation technologies that can improve processing control and expand production opportunities in both pet food and treat applications. Balchem’s PetShure team will effectively demonstrate our unique microencapsulated nutrients, inclusions and processing aids. Come let us help you design a product you didn’t think was possible.
K-State Alumni Center

3:45-4:30 p.m.

Workshop presentation 2: Presented by Pet Food Solutions
Reducing the risk of Salmonella contamination in pet food — At Pet Food Solutions we are focused on providing higher quality, cleaner and safer products for the pet industry. Salmonella contamination of pet food is a serious industry concern that has led to a number of product recalls over the last few years. We have developed a process and product that can significantly reduce this risk to major pet food suppliers and the end user. A major risk to Salmonella contamination in dry pet food kibble comes from chicken fat, which is typically added to the kibble after the product is extruded at high temperature. We will discuss our recent studies on factors influencing the growth of Salmonella in chicken fat and our metagenomic analyses of chicken fat. Then we will discuss the use of a new bacteriostatic refined chicken fat (RCF) product that has significantly lower levels of non-fat impurities (both soluble and insoluble) and reduces the risk of Salmonella contamination.
K-State Alumni Center

4:30-6 p.m. 

Research poster presentations and evening networking reception
KSU Alumni Center

6:30 p.m.

Dine-around event (optional)
Choose a dinner topic and restaurant on the sign-up sheet at the registration table at the hotel. Dinner groups will gather in the hotel lobby to depart for the restaurants at 6:15 p.m. (Each participant pays for his or her own food and beverages.)
Local Manhattan restaurants

October 17, 2019

7:30-8 a.m.

Registration material pick-up and check-in
International Grains Program (IGP) facilities

7:30-8 a.m. 

Continental breakfast
International Grains Program (IGP) facilities

8 a.m. -12 p.m. 

Depart for showcase rotations
International Grains Program (IGP) facilities

8:30-9:15 a.m.

Rotation 1 : Presented by Chr. Hansen
Tips, tricks for using naturally sourced colors in pet food — Chr. Hansen offers a broad range of process stable color solutions from natural sources that meet consumers’ and pet owners’ increasing demand for more natural ingredients in pet food. Converting to naturally sourced colors can be a challenge for pet food manufacturers as they can interact with other ingredients and can be impacted by processing parameters. In this interactive workshop, we will focus on heat and pH stability of naturally sourced colors. You will learn how to apply colors to pet food applications and how to choose the most optimal ingredients. Join the session and learn how to keep your pet food visually appealing when moving away from artificial ingredients.
K-State North Campus

9:15-10 a.m.

Rotation 2: Presented by Extru-Tech Inc. and Milne Fruit
Specialty treat production for single screw extrusion — The purpose of this workshop event will be to discuss and highlight the typical pitfalls of producing a specialty meat-add soft-moist treat. The exercise will include both a brief classroom session and a live production demonstration on an Extru-Tech E325 single screw extrusion system. The primary take-away objectives will be the following: discovery of typical process and product issues within the soft-moist treat arena; awareness for operational flexibility of a single-screw architecture (represents more than approximately 95% of all pet food production, OTC); and investigation of “wholesome” substitutes for the typical humectants used to stabilize water activity in treat type products.
K-State North Campus

10-10:30 a.m.

Break

10:30-11:15 a.m.

Rotation 3: Presented by FONA International 
Learn how flavors can enhance pet food, treats — Adapted from FONA’s Pet Care Flavor 201 course, this session is designed to enhance the language we use for evaluation attributes specific to the flavor and aroma of pet food. The session includes hands-on tasting and smelling of the positive and negative sensory attributes in pet food. Flavor attributes are shown on their own as well as in product.
K-State North Campus

11:15 a.m.-12 p.m.

Rotation 4: Presented by Tree Top Ingredients
Formulating pet food products with fruit for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory properties — As pets age, they can develop age-related problems the same as humans. For instance, oxidative stress in animals has been linked to heart failure, cognitive decline and chronic inflammation. Oxidative stress is the destruction of cells caused by free radical molecules. This happens when there aren’t enough antioxidants to neutralize the free radicals. Flavonoids, found within fruit, possess both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that have been found to help counteract and reduce this damage. Participants attending the Tree Top’s interactive lab session will be given an opportunity to formulate innovative products that cross the blood-brain barrier to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.
K-State North Campus

12 p.m.

Petfood R&D Showcase concludes